Category Archives for Job Offer

photo representing resume going down a black hole

How to 10x Your Job Prospects on ZipRecruiter and Indeed

Doesn’t it sometimes feel like your resume has gone down a black hole?

You spend all this time perfecting it, writing a cover letter tailored to the job posting, and then no response.

It can be so depressing… that’s why I wanted to shed some light on what happens on the other end.

A recruiter friend told me she was getting ready to sift through candidate applications. She recently posted a job on online job websites.

I brought pizza and went to her office to watch over her shoulder as she navigated the Recruiter’s version of ZipRecruiter and Indeed, two of the biggest job boards on the Internet.

What I learned was eye-opening:

  1. The first page of your resume is almost always the only thing she can view on the default screen when she clicks on your submission.
  2.  Her eyes went right to the work experience and she quickly scanned if the candidate had relevant accomplishments to the position she was hiring for.
  3. She gave each resume less than 2-3 seconds and if she saw a typo or a bad grammar, she didn’t even bother with the resume.

Here’s how she explained her process to me:

A posting on Indeed or ZipRecruiter can generate 100 – 500 resumes very quickly. I can only schedule 5-10 interviews so the hiring manager can make a final decision. That means I have to be very quick about identifying the right applicants. I’m typically hiring for 20 positions so I don’t have time to spend a whole day sifting through resumes.

Man playing chess

Source: Pexels

Here are some of the things she noticed on the resumes as we scrolled through them:

See this candidate here? He’s worked at this well known consulting firm. I know this is a good thing because I’ve hired others from this company before – they have an excellent training program and they only hire top-notch people. He will be a great candidate for us to consider.

This other candidate, she’s got a military background, and for this position, I need someone who has a very strong work ethic so I will shortlist her as well.

 

PRO TIP:

Nail the experience section of your website especially if you’re submitting it for jobs via Indeed and ZipRecruiter.

Action Step:

What is one improvement you can make to your resume based on this post? Send me a note as a way to hold yourself accountable for taking action:

[contact-form][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]
Home Living Room Interior, Cozy and Welcoming

Don’t Accept a Job Offer in a New City Unless You Do This!

Even if you’re getting a better title or job description, it may simply not add up financially to a promotion in real terms when you calculate housing costs.

Photo of a home in Appleton WI where housing is affordable

Source: Trulia (https://www.trulia.com/p/wi/appleton/n399-red-tail-ln-appleton-wi-54915–2191255800)

This is what $235,000 buys you in Jersey City:

Photo of condo in Jersey City.

 

 Source: Trulia (https://www.trulia.com/p/nj/jersey-city/169-randolph-ave-jersey-city-nj-07305–2006397262)

Here’s a shocking fact: 

In LA, single-family homes easily cost upwards of two million dollars in good neighborhoods. In San Francisco? For $235,000, you may only get a very depressing mold and mildew infested condo (maybe not even that).

Here’s what I recommend you do before you sign the contract to move bag and baggage to a new city:

  1. Go to Trulia, Realtor.com or Zillow and enter your budget for a home. If you’re renting, check rental websites.
  2. Make sure you find a comparable home to the one you’re in right now.
  3. Compare apples-to-apples what the cost of mortgage/rent is going to be in your new city.
  4. Then decide if the job offer is sufficient to cover your costs.

BONUS TIP: Speak to a local realtor or friends (ask on Facebook) which neighborhoods are good, and which school districts are good. This will affect your resale value.

Rent/Mortgage is typically the biggest chunk of your paycheck so it’s important to do this calculation first.

I know it’s easy to get excited about a fancy title or a brand name company but if you don’t like your home, you may regret your decision later.

Let me know how your research goes: 

 [contact-form][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]